Article Type: review

Summary of Doctoral Dissertation

Johann Friedrich Oberlin “A scholarly investigation of his think-ing, his education and his influence upon the world, with a short biography,” by Horand K. Gutfeldt. Accepted in June 1968 at the University of Vienna, Austria.

Read More »

Book Review: History of Christian Philosophy in the Middle Ages by Etienne Gilson

This full scale survey of the rise and decline of medieval thought, in its primary concern with the relationship of faith and reason, of theology and philosophy, unfolds like a classical tragic drama, reaching, in the course of more than a thousand years, its climax in the work of the hero Thomas Aquinas. The dominant Platonism of the early years slowly gives way as Aristotle’s works are rediscovered and digested.

Read More »

Book Review: The Divine Allegory by Hugo Lj Odhner

In the volume before us the author presents the fruits of mature scholarship with the skill of one who is an accomplished master of the English language. Within the brief space of a hundred and fifty pages he gives a remarkable resume of Bible history and geography, illuminated throughout by the spiritual truth revealed in the Theological Writings of Emanual Swedenborg, and correlated with the most recent findings in the field of archeology.

Read More »

Book Review: The Swedenborg Epic

It is now more than two years since the publication of Cyriel Sigstedt’s The Swedenborg Epic. This work has received some consideration in these pages, but recently a review by Dr. Ernst Benz of Marburg (in the Review of Religion, November 1953) has come to our attention and has aroused some reflections. This month of Swedenborg’s birthday seems an appropriate time to discuss the Epic and other biographies of Swedenborg. The following is from Dr. Benz’s review, and is reproduced with the permission of the Review of Religion…

Read More »

Book Review: The Scientific Adventure

This book is a collection of essays on the history and philosophy of science by an eminent astrophysicist who is now Professor of History and Philosophy of Science at University College, London. The book is divided into two sections: Historical Essays (9), and Philosophical Essays (10). All have been selected by the author from his previous writings and lectures. In his Preface, Professor Dingle says: “The order of the chapters is not chronological, nor is there usually any direct connecting link between one chapter and the next. The unity of the book is to be found in its viewpoint, and such value as it may have arises from the degree to which it succeeds in making the advantages of that viewpoint clear.”

Read More »