Article Type: series

The Worship and Love of God: A Study in Theatrical Form (Part 2)

I have referred in the previous article to the fact that the cosmology in The Worship and Love of God (and that of the Principia from which it is derived) seems to belong on a “line” of cosmologies running through Greek and Roman literature to a very early source. The image of the vortical movement of creation occurs all over the world: in megalithic design, in the Hindu myth of the “churning of the ocean” and in similar myths among the Pueblo peoples of the southwestern United States, and on the north-west coast of America, where it is usually symbolised as a whirl-pool.1 Our current knowledge of the pre-Greek literatures of the Middle East and the material collected by ethnographers enables us to trace this line with fair assurance; but this material was not available to Swedenborg. It is astonishing that he should have succeeded in finding this central line on the basis of a knowledge only of Scripture and of Greek and Latin literature.

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The Worship and Love of God: A Study in Theatrical Form

This series of six articles arises out of a conviction that Emanuel Swedenborg’s Latin prose poem, The Worship and Love of God, contains the germ of a new idea of art, one with almost unlimited possibilities of development. Such an idea would be a universal, even, in a sense, a universal of universals. As such, it should be considered by those trained in philosophy. I will Emit myself to considering some possibilities of application to the theatre, particularly the poetic drama.

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The Philosophy of Education

The work of education is one of the most important of human employments. In its widest sense it includes the instruction of adults as well as children, in spiritual as well as in natural things, and in this sense it is the most important of all uses, because it not only prepares for a good and useful life in this world, but it also prepares for eternal life in heaven.

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